Misplaced ?


Please excuse the poor quality of this photograph, and instead, focus on the subject matter. Next to the decoration with the red ribbon is one of our porch light fixtures (a bit dusty). It is approx. 5 feet above the landing. The light green siding is made of steel and is slick. Now for the anomaly of sorts…there is a black walnut balanced painstakingly between the light fixture wall base and the glass lens. We don’t have a black walnut tree in our yard, but a neighbor must. Nor do we have a ladder from the porch landing to the light fixture. So, how did the nut get there? And, why of all places was it placed there?


My guess is this little guy leaped his way to the light fixture and neatly placed the walnut for future feeding. This is a typical gray squirrel which are super prevalent in this part of America. Some regions have brown, red and even black squirrels. We simply have an abundance of these fun critters. They bury all manner of seeds, fruits and other eatables all over the yard, in flower pots and even on light fixtures. When they go looking for them, the yard looks like a mine field with holes everywhere. It is especially nice when they rip out the flowers and vegetables from pots! It really doesn’t matter because they aren’t that big of a nuisance, unless you want to harvest the vegetables you planted in the garden. Carson can’t stand them. However, I enjoy watching them play as they chase each other across the yard, and up / down and through trees.

As we leave 2016 behind and embrace 2017, I hope whatever has been misplaced in your life will be found and put to good use again…or, at least enjoyed.




Double Vision


When this double vision ends and I see clearly again, will I be any better off and make sense of life? 

When I feel that my existence seems like that of a spectator, will I ever become a participant?

When the cold of winter and loneliness of the holidays overwhelm me, will I cry myself to sleep?

When faith flickers like a dying candle, what will become of me? Will I have mattered to anyone?


I will be better off, and so will others, once I regain clarity, and I will understand my life’s purpose.

I am already a participant, I just need a little encouragement to help me understand this truth.

I will cry no longer-even though I needed to for a moment-because joy is just around the corner.

I will light another candle-thus keeping my faith-for my life matters very much. It matters to those who love me and to those who are yet to know me; to the lost who need me and to those who have helped me; to the sojourner who has double vision and to the blind who can’t see at all. No more tears, no more despair, and no more loneliness for there is One who loves me just as I am. Prince of Peace come join me now and help me to show others the way. 




Wreath Squared

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No matter what a wreath symbolizes for you, I have not seen very many which are square and full of unusual flowers and grains as in this beauty. Some very creative person(s) created this for a small boutique store in midtown Kansas City. I just couldn’t pass up the opportunity to snap a pic with my cell phone.

Generally, we consider wreaths with Christmas, although a few enterprising folk will display all manner of wreaths throughout the year. This particular wreath was presented specifically for this holiday season. It is certainly festive and well done. So, why write about wreaths, and reveal this wreath in particular? Symbolism, as well as beauty and appreciation, for that which we admire (at least I do).

There are many symbolic interpretations for wreaths, but the main idea is that the circular (or square) shape without beginning or end reflects the full circle of life. In Christianity, the wreath was introduced through the Lutheran Church in the 16th Century and was a visual tool to understand the advent and birth of Christ. The evergreen branches are the most common of wreaths at this time of year because they represent life throughout the full year, regardless of how difficult the conditions may be to survive.

I see a bit more when I view a wreath, regardless of its shape, materials or when it is presented. I see beauty and creativity. Over-simplification some may say. Droll say others. But why must a wreath be about a specific occurrence or have a particular look each year? I believe that God created all that is natural and beautiful, including giving mankind the ability to create and enhance beauty. Of course, no one can outdo the Creator, but we can certainly strive to honor Him by imitating His creation. I fully understand that one’s interpretation of beauty is extremely subjective and is a topic I choose not to tackle in this post!

What I believe and what I know are very personal, yet I select what content I wish to share and some which I don’t. Such is my prerogative of creating and supporting this blog. However, let it be known once again that I am blessed to see, touch, hear, and emotionally feel the beauty God has given mankind each and every day I live. I sincerely hope you are given (or make) the opportunity to slow down long enough to experience such sublime beauty this holiday season. Thanks again for visiting and encouraging me. Also, I am grateful for your own unique beauty! Share it…please.



Tis’ the Season…a Prayer



I believe most people, regardless of religious affiliation, want to live in peace. This is preciously why Jesus came to earth. The angels announced when He was born, “Peace on Earth and good will towards men” (women, too). Why there is so much division among various peoples of the earth can be easily explained. Man is inherently selfish and prideful, and wants his own way regardless of who is afflicted or abused. In fact it is those whom Jesus focused on the most-the downtrodden and forsaken.

I sincerely want everyone who reads this post to know that I pass no judgement because of one’s beliefs (or lack of beliefs). And, I am very, very grateful for those who follow my blog and for those who stumble upon it. I find it gratifying to know that even one person finds either what I have to say or the the photographs I take to be of enough importance to stop for a moment and sneak a peak at one of my posts. I certainly enjoy some of my fellow bloggers’ words and pics, and am especially grateful for the regulars who visit me. As always, I welcome your comments. Now, for my prayer.

Please Lord, let there be peace upon the earth, and let it begin with me.                                                                                         




While in Puerto Vallarta, we participated in one of the most wonderful, worthwhile and fun Eco-system projects imaginable…the releasing of Olive ridley sea turtles!


Cute, isn’t he (or she)? In brief detail, here is what takes place. For months prior to December the females come ashore to bury their eggs (called clutches) and then return to the ocean. A clutch can have anywhere from fifty to two hundred eggs. Average is around 125 eggs per clutch. The Olive ridley is listed as vulnerable whereas it’s cousin the Kemp ridley (Atlantic ocean turtle) is on the endangered list. Both turtles lay their eggs in the same beaches where they were born…some 13 years after birth. Isn’t God’s design grand?!


Biologists comb the beaches at night (when most mothers come ashore) and find the clutch hole covered with sand. The biologist then digs up the eggs and places them in a container and reburies them in a secured fenced area set aside for this purpose. Each clutch of eggs has a marker telling the date found, quantity and expected date to hatch (average is 45 days). The enclosed area looks like a cemetery with rows of markers. But instead of death, there will be life. We stayed at a Marriott hotel which has been participating in this effort for fifteen years. In fact, all across the globe, Marriott does similar rescues where endangered species abound.

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In America, only trained biologists can let the turtles go. They quarantine the nest and monitor it until the turtles hatch, and then they secure the path to the sea. Padre Island is one of the most highly populated areas for sea turtle eggs. Perhaps that is why in the USA the turtles on the Atlantic side are secured because they are endangered. I don’t know about the procedure along the Pacific beaches in America. Regardless, to hold one or two of these little guys in your hands and then let them and race (slowly) to the ocean is spell-binding. We are told only 2% of all sea turtles make it to adulthood which is at least ten years old. Some can live up to one hundred years. An average adult sea turtle can lay from one to three clutches per year. Times that by hundreds of thousands and the 2% doesn’t seem so minimal. Nevertheless, with man and nature vying for the same territory, endangerment is always a possibility. We are so grateful to Marriott for this program and for Mexico allowing anyone to participate. FYI-the sandy hands are a requirement. Before anyone can handle  one of these little guys, they must scrub their hands with wet sand to eliminate any type of lotion or foreign substance from their hands.


How many do you think are in this large container?

Up a Tree

We returned from Mexico (please see previous post) two nights ago. Cheryl had a wonderful trip, as did I. The timing, weather, sights and people were all terrific.

We did some different things this trip such as hike to the top of a jungle peak and rented a car to visit some coastal out-of-the-way towns near Puerto Vallarta. Also, we saw some unusual creatures in trees. Once you see one and start looking closely, you will see many more which were not previously perceptible. I am referring to Iguanas which come in different sizes and colors. Some are green with exceptionally long tails while others are an off-orange color with larger spikes on their backs. They all like to hang around in trees among the local bird population. They are sometimes referred to as chickens of the trees because there meat tastes like chicken-supposedly, even though their flesh is a reddish color. No, we didn’t try a plate of Iguana; we just read a lot about them.

Here is one photograph I hope you find as interesting to view as it was to witness in person. There were at least seven or eight iguanas we could see from this one spot. However, this guy gave us the best view to shoot, along with his feathered friends. It is worth enlarging!