About Michael Doran

I have been encouraged and inspired by many throughout my life, and seek to do the same for others. My blogs and photographs reflect who I am and what I am thinking or seeing at the moment I post something. I hope what I share brings pleasure and meaning to others. Thank you for viewing my posts.

Heading Home

Zooming past me and other curious railroad enthusiasts, the Union Pacific’s “Big Boy” steam locomotive (and accompanying support cars) raced westward on it’s way back to Cheyenne, Wyoming. This image was taken on September 2nd at approx. 0948 hour between Kansas City and Lawrence, Kansas.

After photographing the restored beauty at Union Station, I wanted to witness this behemoth on the open road which is where he was intended to function…and for pulling freight across America’s mountains. It may be years, if ever again, he runs our way. I would call this steel wonder a ‘she’ if it were named Big Girl, but gender selection must have been by a man !

Hearing his steam whistle miles distant, seeing the approaching steam skirt and smoke rising from his boiler, the anticipation of Big Boy was over in seconds…kind of like a lot of things we experience in life. Was it worth researching a decent spot to shoot him as he approached? Was it worth hurrying to the predetermined location and hoping I didn’t miss his arrival? Was it worth feeling the rush of air hit me as he passed, similar to what I used to experience once-upon-a-time as a locomotive engineer for Santa Fe? Yes, it was worth it.

Life is made up of moments-some last only seconds while others several minutes. When we add them all together we realize that our lives comprise myriad moments. Some good, some bad and many neutral, but they all count. A worthwhile goal, at least in my opinion, is to make as many moments as pleasant as possible. These are the ones that put a smile on our faces and bring about happy thoughts. Life is tough, and seems to be getting tougher, so occasional moments such as watching an old steam locomotive zoom by at highway speeds is a nice distraction. This pleasing moment will not soon be forgotten.

Whether coming or going, we have many opportunities to make a positive impact upon others. When we meet with family, friends, acquaintances or strangers, we have the privilege of creating a meaningful and positive moment. My success rate at accomplishing this lofty goal falls short of what I feel should be my personal Gold Standard, but I achieve far less if I fail to try.

B I G B O Y

Union Pacific “Big Boy” steam locomotive

Our Native American ancestors nicknamed the steam locomotive, The Iron Horse, after this new mode of transportation began rolling across freshly laid tracks in the vast western United States. The Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869. The locomotives then were much smaller than this giant, but performed well enough to carry millions of passengers and freight across plains, mountains and deserts over the course of 1900 miles (3000 kilometers) of steel rails.

I wish I could state that the advent of transcontinental rail travel was a success for everyone, but that is not the case. Certainly, the myriads of settlers heading to the Promised Lands of the West Coast were overjoyed to abandon the wagon trains which preceded them. However, our Native American brethren (they were called Indians) suffered much as the railroad basically cut their living and hunting domain in half, and quickly brought about the wholesale slaughter of buffalo and added to the demise of their nations.

As technology advanced, locomotives became more powerful as the terrain and loads dictated. The Union Pacific commissioned a score of these behemoths, the largest steamers built, between 1941 and 1944. They traversed the steep grades of the Rocky Mountains until 1962. Diesel Electric locomotives eventually replaced these marvels of steel and steam.

Two key ingredients are necessary to make steam: water and heat. Steam locomotives have large boilers which accept water from their holding tanks. Heat is created by burning wood, coal or oil. Just as todays vehicles need refueling / recharging so did the steamers require frequent stops for taking on water and fuel.

The Union Pacific recently finished an extensive refurbishing of this locomotive, and it is currently operating along their rail lines from Cheyenne, Wyoming to New Orleans, Louisiana; making a ten-state, round-trip tour. Kansas City is fortunate to be one of the longer stops. The Golden Age of Rail may be over, but nostalgia isn’t as can be attested to by the throngs of folks who flock to see this steam engine and its train.

As with all things related to man, technology and the ability to produce it creates blessings and curses. How we view innovation and use technology often determines the end result…I try to remain positive in this accelerated world we live in.

P.S. I DO like my air conditioning, refrigerator, house, car, fresh food, etc. Oh, and the freedom to enjoy them. Grateful, hopeful, and cautious.

Trawlers

Came across this painting while being seated at a delicious water front restaurant in Savanah, Georgia. Fishing trawlers lined-up in neat rows.

Found it to be a stunning representation of the Atlantic seaboard. The vivid colors, obscured details, and masts raised high beckoned me to look closer at this idyllic setting. The un-named artist created a maritime timeless image…may not be Fine Art, but it is eye catching and soothing to the soul.

Too many words spoil the effect…kind of like over-analyzing Simone Biles decision to pull-out of the remaining women’s gymnastic Olympic competition. I try to imagine the emotional pressure she has been under while performing flawlessly until…

Cannot relate to being the best at anything so this kind of stress is unfamiliar. However, there are other life stressors which exact similar reactions, as most of us have experienced to one degree or another. Hopefully, we garner the kind of help she is receiving. It is very encouraging to witness the support from coaches and teammates.

Masts up ! The sun shines even after the fiercest storms.

Another World

Just returned from a trip to another world, down-loaded my photos, and decided to post a few of them. The Cyprus trees (with their knees) are standing tall.

This Oak tree is 400-plus years of pretzel-like branches running up, down and all-around.

Drapes of Spanish Moss encompassed us wherever we traveled.

Can you guess where we visited ?

L U S H

Stock Photo

Lush…the one word which sounds as rich as its meaning. “Lussshhh”…growing luxuriantly. Also, very rich and providing great sensory pleasure.

With relentless pressing, Spring births the effulgent offering of natural drama. A drama which never gets old, but actually becomes more precious with time. As I witness the scintillating wonder of new growth, from seed-to-leaf or sprig-to-flower, I am easily transported to the simple discoveries I made as a child.

Never without a question, I always wanted to (and still do) know “Why is this…?” or “What’s that for?”. No longer a child, I wonder if my curiosity is morphing into apathy. I quickly respond that I am still amazed at “all things bright and beautiful”, as James Harriot noted in the title of one of his books. Therefore, I am happy to announce that my spirit is not being quenched with age nor will it ever be. I concede that the body will break down and the mind may suffer attrition, but the spirit, the soul, will not be rendered obsolete. And, it should never be treated as such (applies to all people).

Kauffman Memorial Garden, Kansas City, MO

Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” transforms a composition of orchestral music into a sensual masterpiece. Each season is represented by a unique and sublime expression from every instrument the great composer has under his direction. The result is mesmerizing as the listener is taken on a journey through time. I liken nature’s annual rhythms with man’s breadth of life, just as Vivaldi correlated music with the four seasons. The final season being just as marvelous as the first.

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, Kansas City, MO

The New Green

Labels can be very helpful like: ‘Poison-Harmful or Fatal if Shallowed’ or ‘Do Not Touch-Extremely Hot’. Besides warnings, labels assist us in identifying food ingredients, movie content, product capabilities, etc. Along with word and number labels, colors help us associate various products and/or classes of things; John Deere Green for instance is easily recognized throughout most of the world.

In this photo, grass and leaves are definitely green. So are the ball and Kermit the Frog. The flux welder and extension cord are green. This T-shirt is green (so are Shamrocks, usually!). The cucumber, Starbucks’ emblem, and stained glass butterfly are also green. What isn’t green is the box. However, if one were color-blind and simply took the message printed on the box as gospel, then the box is green.

Ahh…here, we come upon one example of a label with double meaning (not to be confused with “double entendre”). Although the box is a gray-beige color with near black lettering, the label states otherwise. Yet, we know the Green on the box is referring to recycled materials which, in turn, leave less of a carbon footprint on the environment. But how do we know this to be so?

Repetition, repetition, repetition…

Does repeating something over and over, especially in the public arena, make it true? This question is easily applied to any bias. Unfortunately, in our current culture, bias is causing a great deal of confusion and stress. We need less of both.