Horse Power

I have been a high performance kind of guy (gearhead for short) since I was old enough to understand speed and cars. I came of age during the Muscle Car Era, and weekly racing was as common as going out to grab a soda or beer (underaged at that time). I owned several muscle cars including a ’67 mustang, ’69 Mopar Superbee with six-pack carbs, and a ’70 Roadrunner with dual quad carbs. I didn’t have the bucks to really add more horsepower as many of my friends did, but it was still a blast and good memories. I set no records, but had a lot of thrills.

Below you will see two images: one of a magnificent horse in the early morning sunlight on a cold day (one of my favorite images) and a combination of that same horse with a diesel-electric locomotive pulling a southwest bound load of coal cars to some power plant.

I love horses for their majestic beauty, sheer strength and independence. I love fast cars with their mind-boggling horsepower as that of a dragster or funny car with almost 8,000 horsepower! Try zero to 300 mph at less than 4 seconds in a quarter mile and you will begin to understand these rockets on wheels.

However, without the horse, how could man develop a symbol for power! Besides, the horse is a God-given creation whereas a machine is a God-given adaptation of the original design. Both are important, but my money is on the original.

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Dual horsepower with the original in the fore-ground. Isn’t he wonderful…the horse)?

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BTW, I was a locomotive engineer for several years!

Rusty

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There is something about the majesty of a horse which has always captured my attention. Although I have never owned one (my sisters have), I admire their valiant appearance, renowned deeds of bravado and strength, and often a touch of grace.

This setting is idyllic, except for the drab effects of winter’s grays and browns. The wide open field, clear pond and a splattering of trees among the hillside make for a painter’s eye to capture and her hand to recreate as she chooses. Since I don’t paint, my simple photographs will have to do. I just wanted to share him with you.

Rusty, as I have named him due to the obvious color, is one of three equines which can be found most days grazing or lying on the field of grass near the fence, next to a busy road. He is a curious fellow and doesn’t mind me approaching him with camera in hand. I suppose one could describe him as friendly and inquisitive. He is also quite handsome.

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