IMG_0092 (2)

There are 1,795 species within the genus of the plant family called Begoniaceae (Wikipedia). They are commonly referred to as begonias. The image above is simply one example of this flowering plant.

Colors, shapes, sizes, leaves, buds, flowers, stems make each begonia unique…rather like people. Whether they are native to the soil where they originally thrived or are imported to a local nursery or store, the beauty of these flowers is in the eye of the beholder.

Certainly there are more grand and complex flowers than the begonia, but few genus’ have as many species. And, each species may produce thousands, if not millions, of the same plant type. Yet, each one is totally unique. Again, I am reminded of all the variations within the species of Homo sapiens.

Although red is not my favorite color, I have owned several red vehicles and find red blossoming flowers to be special. Perhaps red colored cars produce a significant contrast against the background of dull pavement and the abundance of white vehicles. And, it may be that when red blossoms are compared to vivid green leaves and stems they stand out so well.

As Mike Savage, a local Kansas City artist states, “Art is simple. You either like it or you don’t”. The same holds true with flowers, trees, birds, music, clothing, buildings, etc. However, there is one thing which should never be placed in the category of being liked or disliked.

People, as in ethnicity, gender and age.

Color, customs, language, tribe, religion, culture or any other differences should not be liked or disliked, but celebrated for their uniqueness. As long humans strive for peaceful co-existence they can all be red for that matter!

Red in Green

5-22-15 015This morning I shot a bird, but not in the sense of hurting it. As I walked a local park right after sunrise, I spotted this cardinal alight on a tree branch. It was rather far away so I had to go full zoom to capture it. Although not the clearest of photographs, it was worth taking anyway. These birds are timid and difficult to capture through a lens as they seldom stay in one place for but a few minutes, and they hide in thick-branched trees. He was happily singing away right before I shot this image.

Cardinals are native to the Midwest, but I also saw several other bird species which are not. The avian migration period is coming to an end so we will see less and less foreign birds who are moving on to their specific geographical regions for the summer. Thankfully, we have our resident robins and blue jays, starlings, doves, and a variety of song birds to bring us enjoyment all season long.

I have always wondered what it would be like to be “free as a bird”…to take flight at the slightest whim, to pause wherever I wanted, and to have a “bird’s-eye view” of our sphere of domain. I can only imagine. What birds take for granted, it would be sheer delight for humans to fly without the aid of machines. I can only imagine.