Dreaming of Summer

The absence of zinnias, monarchs, and vibrant greens make me long for summer. So, I decided to reveal some color to offset the dull hues of winter’s landscape. Not that winter can’t be beautiful, especially in the mountains, but here we have had little snow or color-just drab days and cold nights. Here are a few images taken last summer in our flower garden. There are so many more to reveal, but less is usually best. Think warm!
Monarchs & Zinnias c 9-18-11Monarchs & Zinnias h 9-18-11Monarchs & Zinnias a 9-18-11

Que Sera, Sera

5-5-15 018A tightly bound, delicately wrapped, pin pointed, bundle of potential awaits her unfurling. Do you know what type of flower she is? What she will look like? What color she will be? It won’t take long to find out…just one night and she will open.

Spring is like magic when all that lays dormant comes to life, browns turn to green, buds form on twigs, seeds drop to reproduce, and colors explode while fragrances enchant.

I am reminded of the song made famous by Doris Day, called Que Sera, Sera. It was created by the song-writing team of Livingston and Evans for a Hitchcock movie starring Doris Day and Jimmy Stewart in 1956. It later became her signature song. Funny, but she didn’t want to sing it, thinking it sounded childish. The first lyrics are as follows:

When I was just a little girl, I asked my mother what will I be? Will I be pretty, will I be rich? Here’s what she said to me. Que Sera, Sera, Whatever will be, will be. The future’s not ours to see. Que Sera, Sera. What will be, will be.

So, what is this flower and what color is it? Scroll down and you may be surprised!

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Quote & Pic of the Day, No. 19 of 24

 

This is Elliot Michael, our grandson. He is eighteen months young, and is a very special boy. Elliot will share his family with a sibling come September !                   3-8-15 014” When you recover or discover something that nourishes your soul and brings joy, care enough about yourself to make room for it in your life. ”                       Jean Shinoda Bolen

Opportunist

5-10-14 001As a photographer, one has to be ready at a moment’s instance to capture something strikingly beautiful or unusual…or, in this case, something that is an everyday occurrence, but most never witness. In a nut shell, photographers are opportunists. With this in mind, I present a bird of prey that was an opportunist on Saturday morning. While at Loose Park, one of Kansas City’s jewels, Cheryl and I strolled through the rose garden. It is still a bit early for roses, but something else caught our eyes and lenses. A red-tailed hawk catching his breakfast! I must apologize for the blur in these photos due to being startled by what was taking place, but I wanted to share them anyway simply because nature is so awesome. It happened so fast that the entire episode lasted mere seconds. The eating of the prey took all of five minutes. All photos are unedited.5-10-14 002The prey was spotted and the predator took off….5-10-14 004Bringing back his reward…5-10-14 007And, preparing to dine on the same perch he catapulted from only a few seconds ago. Some call this dynamic the circle of life. Perhaps it is…life for some and death for others. It is the way of this world we live in. One day, there will be no more death. What a glorious time that will be!